The new normal – Day 11

March 27, 2020

Left%3A+Katelyn+Lopez%27s+brother+napping%2C+Katelyn+Lopez+reading+in+the+middle%2C+and+her+sister+watching+television.

Photo courtesy of Katelyn Lopez

Left: Katelyn Lopez's brother napping, Katelyn Lopez reading in the middle, and her sister watching television.

Spencer Cameron, Staff Writer

Editor’s note: “The new normal” is a continuing series that looks into how members of the Los Medanos College community are coping with a shelter-in-place order amid the COVID-19 pandemic. 

As the quarantine and statewide shelter-in-place order continues, students are still learning to adapt to a new way of learning.

Dual-enrolled Los Medanos College and high school student Katelyn Lopez now relies on a spotty internet connection to get her school work done.

“Quarantine hasn’t been that much of a change for me. So far it’s been a more peaceful awakening to spend a bit more time with my family,” wrote Lopez via text. “A few challenges I’ve faced is also being captive in my house. I like to go out every once in a while just to make a change in my day.”

The high school senior has also been studying criminal justice and college success at LMC, and noticed a difference between the two educational systems.

“Being enrolled in both has been a bit helpful because it keeps me balanced with work,” she said. “High school has been slow so the college classes help me keep up the fact that it’s still work needing to be done.”

While LMC classes still continue online, she said the high school isn’t as focused in continuing curricular activities.

“The high school doesn’t seem to be doing much about it like the college,” Lopez added. “College is very important and they take it with a more stronger approach by using online classes.”

Even though LMC is taking a more active approach to continuing formerly face-to-face classes online, the process is not always simple, especially when there is a lack of access to necessary course tools and resources.

“The online classes aren’t as easy as in person, but they are still able to provide the proper information needed with the courses,” Lopez said. “They’re not so easy due to the lack of internet access. Not everyone has the materials needed.”

Unfortunately with minimal internet access, the stress of her work hours being cut, and a recent housing change due to the pandemic, she recently decided to withdraw from the college courses she was taking.

“I currently dropped the classes due to the fact that I do not have the proper equipment nor internet access that I need,” she added. “It is also a struggle to do them at home when there are many other surrounding responsibilities that need to be done such as currently having to move houses, as well as keeping up with money and working.”

While some have been successfully dealing with the pandemic, others have had a lot to deal with.

“Everything has been very hectic due to hours being cut from jobs or simply being laid off. I feel as though we should do things the old-fashioned way and have things mailed to us such as paperwork. We should not rely so much on the internet,” she said.